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Last Modified: April 21, 2021

Urban Forestry

Trees and other plants help cool the environment, making vegetation a simple and effective way to reduce urban heat islands.

Trees and vegetation lower surface and air temperatures by providing shade and through evapotranspiration. Shaded surfaces, for example, may be 20–45°F (11–25°C) cooler than the peak temperatures of unshaded materials. Evapotranspiration, alone or in combination with shading, can help reduce peak summer temperatures by 2–9°F (1–5°C).

Landscapes: Urban. Intervention Type: Environmental Cooling. Intervention Level: Community. Intervention Timescale: Long Term.
Public cooling centres
Last Modified: March 23, 2021

Public cooling centres

Vulnerable people should stay in cool or air-conditioned1 environments during an episode of extreme or unusual heat. A city can designate public places as refuges during a heatwave, including air-conditioned common spaces such as museums, malls, community centres, libraries and other large spaces that can justify a backup generator in case of a blackout.

Intervention Type: Physiological Cooling. Intervention Level: Individual. Intervention Timescale: During Heat Event.
Increase fluid intake
Last Modified: April 20, 2021

Increase fluid intake

Increasing fluid intake during periods of extreme heat is beneficial. Drinking frequently without waiting to feel thirsty can reduce the risk of heat impacts. This is especially important for older people. It is also important for caregivers to be alert to hydration levels in those who are unable to care for themselves (bedridden patients, children, cognitively impaired).

Landscapes: Athletics and Household. Intervention Type: Physiological Cooling. Intervention Level: Individual. Intervention Timescale: During Heat Event.

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